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Posts Tagged ‘2019 Season’

The Importance of Being Ernest

Mon. Dec. 23

by Oscar Wilde

Directed by Kyle Haden
Comedy, Farce
CRT Mainstage   MAP

It’s 1895 and Jack Worthing is engaged–that is if he can convince his potential mother-in-law to accept him. And that might prove difficult since his fiancé thinks his name is Ernest. Oh, and he doesn’t know who his parents are. Not to mention his ward thinks she’s ALSO engaged to Ernest. Oh dear! Mistaken identities and the search for one’s true self frame Oscar Wilde’s most famous comedy of manners.

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As each person is different, we are not offering specific ratings for our shows this year. However, we are providing a content advisory and link to trigger warnings. We are also glad to talk with you if you have specific questions.

Content Advisory: This production contains witty repartee, Bunburying, and excessive Britishness.

Trigger Warnings: click HERE

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DIRECTOR’S NOTE

Oklahoma!

Mon. Dec. 23

Music by Richard Rodgers
Book and Lyrics by Oscar Hammerstein II
Based on the play “Green Grow the Lilacs” by Lynn Riggs

Directed by Maurice LaMee
Musical, Classic
CRT Mainstage   MAP

The place is Oklahoma territory at the turn of the 20th century, a time when ranchers and cowboys are squaring off over land and water rights and love is in the air. Curly loves Laurey, though Laurey isn’t quite sure about Curly. Will Parker loves Ado Annie, though Ado loves, well, everybody! This 1943 Broadway hit was the first modern musical to weave catchy songs with vivid storytelling. Join us for this classic story about love and belonging.

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As each person is different, we are not offering specific ratings for our shows this year. However, we are providing a content advisory and link to trigger warnings. We are also glad to talk with you if you have specific questions.

Content Advisory: This production contains mild language, some violence, some flirtation, romance, and lots of sky.

Trigger Warnings: click HERE

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Annie

Mon. Dec. 23

Book by Thomas Meehan
Music by Charles Strouse
Lyrics by Martin Charnin

Directed by Brittni Shambaugh Addison
Musical, Family-Friendly
CRT Mainstage   MAP

One of the world’s most beloved musicals reaches the Creede stage! Join us for the adventures of Little Orphan Annie and her band of waifs and strays, featuring some amazing local talent. As Annie attempts to find her real parents, she enchants the rich and famous Oliver Warbucks while escaping the clutches of the devious Miss Hannigan, played by Kate Berry.

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As each person is different, we are not offering specific ratings for our shows this year. However, we are providing a content advisory and link to trigger warnings. We are also glad to talk with you if you have specific questions.

Content Advisory: This production contains some mild language, an often intoxicated orphanage nanny, orphan shenanigans, and a happy ending.

Trigger Warnings: click HERE

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Grounded

Mon. Dec. 23

by George Brant
Directed by John DiAntonio

MOTHERHOOD. MARRIAGE. MILITARY.

A hot-shot fighter pilot with a passion for the sky has her life forever changed by an unexpected pregnancy. Once the fearless pilot of an F-16, she now spends her days flying a military drone from a windowless trailer in the Nevada desert. Caitlin Wise stars in this gripping one-woman show that explores parenthood, military life, PTSD, and how one copes when the lines begin to blur between the horrors of war, and the safety of home.

Drama

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As each person is different, we are not offering specific ratings for our shows this year. However, we are providing a content advisory and link to trigger warnings. We are also glad to talk with you if you have specific questions.

Content Advisory: This production contains intense adult themes and strong language.

Trigger Warnings: click HERE

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The Roommate

Mon. Dec. 23

by Jen Silverman

Directed by Christy Montour-Larson
Comedy-Drama
The Ruth Humphreys Brown Theatre  MAP

In her sprawling Iowa farmhouse, newly divorced empty-nester Sharon seeks a roommate. Her ad is answered by Robyn, a woman with a past looking to start over. As Robyn’s secrets are revealed, Sharon takes control of her own life in ways she never expected. Part The Odd Couple, part Thelma & Louise, this beautiful and deeply funny play stars Christy Brandt and Annie Butler.

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As each person is different, we are not offering specific ratings for our shows this year. However, we are providing a content advisory and link to trigger warnings. We are also glad to talk with you if you have specific questions.

Content Advisory: This production contains some strong language, depiction of marijuana use, adult situations, ungrateful adult children, and some scheming.

Trigger Warnings: click HERE

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Fully Committed

Mon. Dec. 23

by Becky Mode

Directed by Steven Cole Hughes
Comedy
The Ruth Humphreys Brown Theatre  MAP

This laugh-out-loud comedy follows a day in the life of Sam, an out-of-work actor who manages the red-hot reservation line at the number-one restaurant in town. A cast of desperate callers will stop at nothing to land a prime reservation: impatient socialites, celebrity assistants, top restaurant reviewers, and even a mobster; interrupted only by demands from a hot-headed chef, Sam’s father, agent, boss, and oh so many more. Graham Ward returns to the CRT stage tackling 40 different characters in this comedic tour-de-force!

MORE ABOUT THE SHOW


As each person is different, we are not offering specific ratings for our shows this year. However, we are providing a content advisory and link to trigger warnings. We are also glad to talk with you if you have specific questions.

Content Advisory: This production contains some strong language, dozens of phone calls, copious name-dropping, and one tired actor after the show.

Trigger Warnings: click HERE

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DIRECTOR’S NOTE

Peter and the Starcatcher

Wed. Dec. 26

 

play by Rick Elice
music by Wayne Barker
based on the novel by Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson
directed by Charlie Oates

A curious and intelligent girl from a magical family, a nameless orphan boy, two ships full of sailors ‘n pirates, and adventure at every turn! This family friendly musical uses the magic of theatre to create its stunning world, as twelve actors portray over 100 characters. If you loved 2018’s The Wizard of Oz, you’ll want to batten down the hatches and head up to the poop deck to experience two new friends on their quest to save the world, and witness one of literature’s most beloved characters come to life. A joyous adventure for all ages!

 

Originally produced on Broadway by Nancy Nagel Gibbs, Greg Schaffert, Eva Price, Tom Smedes, and Disney Theatrical Productions. Peter and the Starcatcher is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI. www.MTIShows.com

CREATIVE TEAM
Director – Charlie Oates
Music Director – Andy Hudson
Scenic Design – Logan Greenwell
Costume Design – Amanda McGee
Lighting Design – Kristof Janezic
Sound Design – Jacob K. Harbour

MANAGEMENT
Stage Manager – Megan Barrett*
Asst. Stage Manager – JuanCarlos Contreras*
Asst. Stage Manager – Miranda Ray
Fight Captain – Ben Newman*

CAST
Black Stache – Ben Newman*
Molly – Katrina Michaels*
Boy (Peter) – Nicholas Caycedo
Grempkin/Mack/Sanchez/Fighting Prawn – Bill Lawrence
Mrs. Bumbrake – Anne Faith Butler*
Slank/Hawking Clam – Michael Rawls
Smee – Alexandria Bates
Prentiss – Brade Bradshaw
Alf – Brian Baylor
Lord Aster – Graham Ward*
Captain Scott/Teacher – Caitlin Wise*
Ted – Hagan Oliveras
Understudy – Kayla Johnson

SPONSORS
Antlers Rio Grande Lodge and Restaurant
Broken Arrow Ranch and Land Company
Peggy Longwood Lamb

*Member of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States.


DIRECTOR’S NOTE

Charlie Oates

Peter and the Starcatcher reflects the best of what it is to be a human being.  Think I’m overstating the case for this book? Dave Barry and Ridley Pearson’s young adult novel, upon which the play Peter and the Starcatcher is based, is a story of adventure, friendship, blossoming love, discovery and most of all it is a celebration of imagination. All manner of bizarre events take place in the book sparking the mind to envision the full spectrum of possibilities that exist for a life in this world. In it, a couple of naïve, inexperienced, good hearted young people thwart the aims of older, nasty, violent men who assume these kids will be easily taken advantage of. Pie-in-the-sky fantasy?  Maybe, but the reader sees the potential to go beyond the rational, every day expectations that surround us and shoot for something better.

Of course, J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan, the inspiration for Barry and Pearson’s book is also a flight of imagination. The notion that a young boy who flies and never grows up can exist at all has captivated generations of readers, theatre goers, television and movie watchers.  A story of the impossible will draw us in every time.

The book may be very satisfying, but the theatre is the perfect place for Peter and the Starcatcher. The theatre is an inherently imaginative place and it is my hope that audience members of any age will involuntarily give themselves over to a world where the sky’s the limit.


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Ripcord

Wed. Dec. 26

by David Lindsay-Abaire
directed by Billie McBride

Cantankerous assisted living resident Abby learns she’s been assigned a roommate after years of willful solitude. Enter Marilyn: an energetic and positive force who charms everyone around her…except Abby, of course. The two women make a seemingly harmless bet, that quickly intensifies into a cutthroat competition. Don’t miss Christy Brandt and Annie Butler in this uproarious and exhilarating “odd couple” comedy.

Originally commissioned by the Manhattan Theatre Club (Lynne Meadow, Artistic Director; Barry Grove, Executive Producer) with funds provided by US Trust and received its world premiere there on October 1, 2015. Ripcord is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York.

CREATIVE TEAM
Director – Billie McBride
Scenic Design – Amanda Embry
Costume Design – Elly Hunt
Lighting Design – Kristof Janezic
Sound Design – Jacob K. Harbour

MANAGEMENT
Stage Manager – Victoria Esquibell*
Asst. Stage Manager – McKenna Warren
Asst. Stage Manager – Caroline Castleman

CAST
Abby Binder – Anne Faith Butler*
Marilyn Dunne – Christy Brandt*
Scotty – Brade Bradshaw
Colleen/Woman in White – Jenna Neilsen
Derek/Zombie Butler/Masked Man/Benjamin – Graham Ward*
Lewis/Clown – Hagan Oliveras
Understudies – Kayla Johnson, Hagan Oliveras

SPONSORS
Bob and Dixie Slater
John David Lentz Memorial Endowment Fund
Mickey & Kym Thompson and Jenifer Houston & Alan Busche
The Ramble House and Creede Guide & Outfitters

*Member of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States.


DIRECTOR’S NOTE

Billie McBride

We have always felt that when seniors move to assisted living facilities that they have reached the end of their lives. Sad images of nursing homes have been stamped into our hearts and minds. Ripcord does take place in an assisted living facility, but these two women are far from done. They are opposite in every way. One is a loner and the other very social and filled with joy. One is alone and the other surrounded by family. Each has a secret. Ripcord is about not being able to run away no matter how hard you try.  True to David Lindsay-Abaire’s style there are bizarre happenings but those also never seem impossible. It’s a very funny play laced with sadness, fear and a bit of tragedy but as Lindsay-Abaire says, “There was always this sort of interconnectedness between humor and tragedy because that’s just what life was. If I’m gonna write a comedy, it shouldn’t be a surprise that, underneath it, there’s pain and hurt and desperate need.” But also, it’s filled with hope.


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Little Shop of Horrors

Wed. Dec. 26

book and lyrics by Howard Ashman
music by Alan Menken
based on the film by Roger Corman
screenplay by Charles Griffith
directed by Jessica Jackson

It’s a familiar story: Boy meets Girl. Girl is dating a sadistic dentist. Boy meets mysterious, blood-thirsty plant. In an effort to win over Girl, Boy makes a pact with Plant to allow his wildest dreams to come true. Plant makes plans to take over the world! Since its Off-Broadway debut in 1982, Little Shop quickly became one of the most popular shows in the world. You won’t want to miss this deliciously outrageous sci-fi hit musical.

Little Shop of Horrors was originally directed by Howard Ashman with musical staging by Edie Cowan. Little Shop of Horrors is presented through special arrangement with Music Theatre International (MTI). All authorized performance materials are also supplied by MTI. www.MTIShows.com

CREATIVE TEAM
Director – Jessica Jackson
Music Director – Andy Hudson
Choreographer – Bethany Eilean Talley
Scenic Design – Logan Greenwell
Costume Design – Anthony James Sirk
Lighting Design – Kristof Janezic
Sound Design – Jacob K. Harbour
Fight Director – Dustin Bronson*
Puppet Design – Cory Gilstrap, Imagined Creations

MANAGEMENT
Stage Manager – Megan Barrett*
Asst. Stage Manager – JuanCarlos Contreras*
Asst. Stage Manager – Miranda Ray
Fight Captain – Dustin Bronson*
Dance Captain – Katrina Michels*

CAST
Crystal – Alexandria Bates
Ronnette – Michael Rawls
Chiffon – Kayla Johnson
Mushnik – Bill Lawrence
Audrey – Katrina Michaels*
Seymour – Nicholas Caycedo
Orin/Bernstein/Snip/Luce/and everyone else – Dustin Bronson*
Audrey II Voice – Brian Baylor
Audrey II Manipulation – Ivy Loos-Austin
Understudies – Emily Diaz, Hagan Oliveras

BAND
Conductor/Keys – Andy Hudson
Percussion – Mickey Bertelson
Guitar/Bass – Mason Howell

SPONSORS
Chuck and Kay Harbert & The Rio Grande Angler
Del Norte Bank
San Luis Valley Federal Bank
Valley Courier

*Member of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States.


DIRECTOR’S NOTE

Jessica Jackson

Little Shop is one of those rare, perfect musicals. Musical theatre nerds often disagree about what makes a perfect musical, but for me, it’s one that doesn’t have anything extra. There’s no fat on this lean show. A perfect musical also has equal parts heart and style. Alan Menken and Howard Ashman adapted this musical from a 1960 sci-fi-horror movie – and it unabashedly celebrates its B-movie roots. The characters are iconic, but also lovingly relatable. The monster is low-budget and over-the-top, and yet somehow seductive and terrifying.

Many mid-20th century science-fiction movies explored how humans are capable of tremendous good and surprising evil. In Little Shop, Seymour is our human hero, one of the little guys, aspiring to bring prosperity to Mushnik and security to Audrey. Unfortunately, in order to make Skid Row a better place for those he loves, he must feed people to a giant carnivorous plant. It’s a classic Faustian bargain.

It’s a bargain that many of us make every day. When Seymour sings about living “Downtown…where depression’s just status quo…down on Skid Row,” he’s singing about a life with no foreseeable path to prosperity. His journey from innocent shop-boy to making the proverbial “deal with the devil” is disturbingly relatable. If you were in Seymour’s shoes, what would you do? Would you compromise your morals, just a tiny bit at first (only a few drops of blood), to give those you love a better life?

This big unsettling question is wrapped in a joyous doo-wop score, an underdog love story, and lots of laughs – making Little Shop of Horrors a perfect musical.


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Pride and Prejudice

Wed. Dec. 26

by Kate Hamill
based on the novel by Jane Austen
directed by Amanda Berg Wilson

You’ve never seen Jane Austen quite like this! With the heart of this masterful love story still very much intact, Kate Hamill’s farcical take on this time-honored staple of English literature has never been more captivating. Austen’s Mr. Darcy, Lizzy Bennet, and all the red-coated officers are still the classic characters you remember, but with a fresh energy and zest that’s both stunning and unexpected.

 

World premiere production co-produced by Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival and Primary Stages; June 24, 2017, Hudson Valley Shakespeare Festival (Davis McCallum, Artistic Director; Kate Liberman, Managing Director). November 19, 2017, Primary Stages (Andrew Leynse, Artistic Director; Shane D. Hudson, Executive Director). Pride and Prejudice received a presentation as part of The Other Season at Seattle Repertory Theatre 2016-2017. Pride and Prejudice is presented by special arrangement with Dramatists Play Service, Inc., New York.

CREATIVE TEAM
Director – Amanda Berg Wilson
Scenic Design – Lindsay Fuori (Terrence and Polly Jones Scenic Designer)
Costume Design – Amy Sutton
Lighting Design – Kristof Janezic
Sound Design – Jacob K. Harbour
Original Music – Jacob K. Harbour
Assistant Director – Brade Bradshaw

MANAGEMENT
Stage Manager – Victoria Esquibell*
Asst. Stage Manager – McKenna Warren
Asst. Stage Manager – Caroline Castleman

CAST
Mr. Bingley/Mary – Kate Berry*
Darcy – Dustin Bronson*
Mr. Collins/Wickham/Miss Bingley – Nicholas Caycedo
Lydia/Lady Catherine – Katrina Michaels*
Mrs. Bennet/Servant – Ben Newman*
Lizzy Bennet – Caitlin Wise*
Jane/Miss De Bourgh – DeAnna Wright*
Charlotte Lucas/Mr. Bennet – Bill Lawrence
Understudy – Brittni Shambaugh Addison

SPONSORS
Charles and Karen Nearburg
Marti and Steve Kiely
San Juan Sports
Smokin’ Johnnys BBQ

*Member of Actors’ Equity Association, the Union of Professional Actors and Stage Managers in the United States.


DIRECTOR’S NOTE

Amanda Berg Wilson

I think each time we revisit a classic, we have to ask ourselves why – why this story again? And also how – how are we shedding new light on a tale that has many iterations, many of them beloved?

I grew up loving romantic 19th century British tales like Pride and Prejudice. As a girl, I was enchanted by how, in spite of their initial difficult interactions, Elizabeth and Darcy end up in love. What teenage girl, with her teenage heartaches, doesn’t want to believe that love triumphs?

As a woman, I find myself still intrigued by Lizzy as proto-feminist. Her refusal to be taken, quite literally, into a marriage arrangement on anything but her own terms. I’m also heartened by the lessons she must learn about herself–that her judgement isn’t always spot on, that she can be wrong about people, even as she is sure of herself.

So yes, the why this story again (and now!): Pride and Prejudice is a great proto-feminist tale to revisit in a time where we are aware more than ever of how the battle to recognize women as equals, for who they are, is not yet won. It feels good to look of this early assertion that a woman should be her own person, rather than a property to be married away, and to see how this is widely accepted as fact (at least in our country). It’s a good reminder of  how far we’ve come. But is also is good to think as we watch it: what attitudes towards women today will feel as antiquated as some of those in Pride and Prejudice in the next 150 years?

But how to tell it so that something new is discovered? When I first read it, I was delighted by how decidedly unstuffy this adaptation is. It’s a wonderful revisiting of a classic tale if your only remembrance of Pride and Prejudice is high school English class. It leans into the story’s strong beating heart of English humor and wit, then gives it a contemporary kick. And I’m so excited to do it here at CRT, whose actors–with their late night Boomtown romps, brilliant musical theatre training, and general mountain town joie de vivre–can really bring the rip roaring comedy of it to life.

I hope you revel in our Pride and Prejudice’s sense of discovery and transformation–without giving too much away, we intend to have great fun with the way the people in the story are not who they seem, how an initial impression of something can quickly transform, how this story is both of another time but still has a contemporary spirit.

In this way, we hope to remind you that our ideas of who others are are always swirling, swishing, changing, and being played with. And that love changes our perceptions of people once and twice and then again. Love is is endlessly surprising, revealing. Even for self-certain proto-feminists.

Now that is a story worth telling again.


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